Youth & Teen Counselling

Emphasizing safe and postive empowerment, self-discovery and awareness.

Ways Counselling Can Help

  • Process and resolve depression and/or anxiety
  • Build confidence and self-esteem
  • Overcome conflicts and strengthen your relationship
  • Address relationship issues including communication, conflict, emotional intimacy, sexual intimacy, infidelity (including internet affairs), infertility, child/teen-rearing and blended families
  • Learn to understand and manage emotions
  • Quieten your mind and stop obsessive thinking
  • Develop effective communications with others
  • Manage or eliminate stress
  • Overcome addiction
  • Acquire a calm and centred approach to life
  • Stop negative thoughts and negative self-talk
  • Process and resolve previous life issues
  • Set and achieve life goals
  • Find purpose and meaning for your life

Consider these questions (as the parent of a teenager):

  • Has your teen talked about problems they're experiencing?
  • Has your teen stopped talking to you about problems or issues?
  • Does your teen struggle in school; academically, socially, or both?
  • Has there been a recent change in the home environment?
  • Does your teen experience extreme episodes of depression, anxiety or anger?
  • Do you know or suspect that your teen has been using drugs or alcohol?
  • Has your teen faced disciplinary actions from school or law enforcement?
  • Do you have concerns regarding any behavioural, social, or emotional problems that your teen is demonstrating?

If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, then it may be time to make an appointment with a qualified professional to explore these situations in more detail.

Consider these questions (as the parent of a young child):

  • Has your child talked about problems they're experiencing?
  • Have you tried different things to help your child, but nothing seems to work?
  • Is your child very resistant about going to school, or refuses to go frequently?
  • Has there been a recent change in the home environment?
  • Have you noticed a decrease in your child's ability to cope with certain situations?
  • Has your child been diagnosed with an Anxiety Disorder, Autism Spectrum Disorder, ADHD Disruptive/Impulse Control Disorder?
  • Do you have concerns regarding any behavioural, social or emotional problems that your child is demonstrating?

If you answered "yes" to any of these questions, then it may be time to make an appointment with a qualified professional to explore these situations in more detail.

Play Therapy

Play therapy is a form of therapy that gives children an opportunity to express feelings, show their knowledge, and work through problems in a way that comes naturally to them. Their language skills don't develop as quickly as their cognitive abilities, so play allows them to communicate things that they aren't able to put into words. Even if they have good verbal skills for their age, play often feels like a more natural and comfortable medium of expression - essentially, it's their first language and the easiest for them to use.

Unlike traditional talk therapy, play is the primary mode of communication and expression in this type of therapy. Obviously, this can be particularly useful when working with a pre-verbal child. It can also be a very effective form of therapy when working with a very timid or anxious child who has a difficult time opening up. Play therapy can also be beneficial for individuals with a disability, such as a brain injury or developmental issues, that makes verbal communication difficult or impossible.

Appropriate Ages for Play Therapy

As a general rule, the appropriate ages for play therapy (for children) range from age 2 to 12 years. However, although play therapy is most commonly associated with children, many therapists use it very effectively when treating adults, couples, and families. Play really has no age limits as a therapeutic tool.

Benefits of Play Therapy

As with other types of therapy, play therapy helps to either reduce or eliminate negative behaviours and symptoms and help develop and increase positive ones. Of course, the potential benefits will vary from one child to the next. They include, but aren't limited to:

  • Improved mood
  • Less stress
  • Improved coping skills
  • Decrease in internal conflict
  • Increase in positive emotions
  • Improved communication and verbal skills
  • Better impulse control
  • Greater self-awareness
  • Increase in problem-solving skills
  • Increase in self-confidence
  • Greater self-esteem
  • More appropriate expression of emotions
  • Improved social skills
  • Increased maturity
  • Improved capacity to trust others